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Sunday, August 9, 2020 | History

1 edition of The shrinkage in weight of beef cattle in transit found in the catalog.

The shrinkage in weight of beef cattle in transit

W. F. Ward

The shrinkage in weight of beef cattle in transit

by W. F. Ward

  • 20 Want to read
  • 39 Currently reading

Published by U.S. Dept. of Agriculture in Washington, D.C .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Beef cattle,
  • Shrinkage,
  • Transportation

  • Edition Notes

    Statement[by W.F. Ward and James E. Downing]
    SeriesBulletin of the U.S. Department of Agriculture -- no. 25, Bulletin of the U.S. Department of Agriculture -- no. 25.
    ContributionsDowning, James E.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination78 p. ;
    Number of Pages78
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL25518476M
    OCLC/WorldCa16508188

    price. This weight adjustment is intended to account for gut fill in cattle from grass pastures. Most buyers will also request that cattle be penned and held off feed the morning of shipment. Shrinkage in transit is reduced under these conditions compared to shipping cattle soon after feeding. A lbs grass-fed beef steer would have an expected dressing percentage of 57%, yielding a hot carcass weight of lbs x 57% = lbs hanging weight. However, we can expect % cooler shrink due to evaporative losses during cooling and aging, leaving about lbs of cold carcass weight. lbs hanging weight / cooler shrink = lbs.

    The movement of cattle to and from farms, ranches, feedlots and marketing facilities is an important aspect of beef cattle production. Proper handling and transportation are important for the safety and welfare of the animals being moved. When loading and unloading cattle, personnel should move cattle as quietly and patiently as possible to. CURRENT COST: $/lbs of hanging weight. Beef arrives to customer in freezer shrink wrap with USDA Inspected/Approved labeling. Individual cows vary in hanging weight.

    Conditions Affecting Shrink The loss of weight from an overnight shrink, or a hour stand, will vary because of the type of feed. Cattle on grass, wet beet pulp, or silage will generally shrink 4 %, while fat cattle on concentrates will shrink from % to 3% if no feed or . Shrink in Beef Cattle: A Marketing Consideration; Targeting ADG of Developing Replacement Heifers Using Age and Body Weight; What Is the Economic Impact of Infertility in Beef Cattle? Top. What is EDIS? EDIS is the Electronic Data Information Source of UF/IFAS Extension, a collection of information on topics relevant to you.


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The shrinkage in weight of beef cattle in transit by W. F. Ward Download PDF EPUB FB2

Conditions Affecting Shrink The loss of weight from an overnight shrink, or a hour stand, will vary because of the type of feed. Cattle on grass, wet beet pulp, or silage will generally shrink 4 percent while fat cattle on concentrates will shrink from - 3 percent if no feed or water is available.

If feed andFile Size: KB. Get this from a library. The shrinkage in weight of beef cattle in transit. [W F Ward; James E Downing; United States. Department of Agriculture.].

An overnight stand of 12 hours without feed or water can cause 4 percent shrink in cattle on lush grass or silage. The same cattle on a high grain ration may lose only to 3 percent. Length of Shrink Period. Cattle begin to lose body weight (BW) at the time they are moved; the greatest proportion of BW loss occurs during the early hours (h.

Difference in shrinkage between steers and heifers is variable but heifers shrink slightly more. Finished cattle shrink more than feeder cattle in the first eight to 10 hours. Feeder cattle shrink about 2 percent more on long hauls, up to 7 or 9 percent.

An overnight stand of 12 hours without feed or water can cause 4 percent shrink in cattle. In a research review that examined the basic principles and economics of transportation shrink in beef cattle, Coffey et al. () reported that shrink is a normal occurrence in cattle that affects both the seller and buyer and a few hours to over 30 d are required to replenish this weight loss.

The authors also reported that shrink is not. G.T. Woods, M.E. Mansfield, R.J. Webb, A three year comparison of acute respiratory disease, shrink and weight gain in preconditioned and non-preconditioned Illinois beef calves sold at the same auction and mixed in a feedlot Can.

Comp. Med. () during handling and transport J. Anim. Sci. () Assistant Professor, Beef Cattle In the livestock business producers spend most of their time managing cattle to make them weigh as much as pos-sible by market time.

However, when cattle are gathered, transported, processed, or held without access to feed or water, they loose weight. This weight loss is referred to as shrink in the cattle.

Dairy cattle commonly yield three per cent less in dressing percentage than beef cattle. Dairy cattle tend to lack both finish and muscularity, and therefore have a lower dressing percentage. While dressing percentage differences can be related to mature size, there are other factors such as the weight of the hide, head, feet and viscera, which.

North Dakota Beef Cattle Improvement Association, State Avenue, Dickinson, ND or go to om on the Internet.

In correspon-dence about this column, refer to BT Calf Weights and Shrink Weight Day Total Lot Weight On-truck wei lbs Off-truck wei lbs Total actual shrink % DREC pencil shrink %. In general, the highest shrink rate was observed in the summer (August: %) and winter months (December: %), both of which are outside the thermoneutral zone for beef cattle.

The lowest. The diet that cattle are consuming can affect the amount of fill and subsequent shrink experienced. Diets low in dry matter and high in moisture result in a greater shrinkage, whereas dryer diets create less shrink, or slower weight loss.

Condition/Weight. Cattle that are fatter tend to shrink less than cattle that have less body fat. transit conditions), cattle handling methods, and cattle management (including nutrition). The combined effects of shipping and handling result in greater weight loss than holding cattle off of feed and water alone.

Transit shrink in beef steers represents up to two-thirds of the shrink from the combination of both fasting and transport. The example provided by the Ontario Ministry of Agriculture's fact sheet about cattle shrink (see inset on the right) provides some stark numbers: If a lbs calf is penned, sorted, weighed, and then transported for 8 hrs over kilometers ( miles), you can expect % shrink during the first 30 minutes of sorting, 3% shrink during weighing and loading, 4% shrinkage during the first 4.

Download PDF: Sorry, we are unable to provide the full text but you may find it at the following location(s): ersitylibrary (external link). An Iowa study involving 4, feeder cattle found that cattle purchased from ranchers averaged a percent shrink, compared with a percent shrink on cattle purchased from sale yards.

The cattle in the study were shipped varying distances (from to miles), and there was a percent shrink for each miles in transit. Breeds of Beef Cattle. Beef cattle are generally divided into two different groups: maternal breeds vs.

terminal breeds. Generally, maternal breeds are known for their milk production and mothering ability while terminal breeds are known for their growth and meat producing ability.

As with anything in life, there are some exceptions to this rule. Transportation stress manifests itself in the form of shrink (weight loss) and sickness. Weight loss is in the form of “gut” fill and tissue fluid loss and must be regained before the cattle begin to make production gain (return to payweight).

The time that cattle are in transit has the greatest effect on shrink and should be minimized. With an average market (live or on hoof) weight of 1, lbs and the average yield of %, the typical steer will produce a lb.

(dressed weight) carcass. The dressed beef (or carcass) will yield approximately lbs. (further details below) of red meat and trim (take home meat - which includes the average weight of 27 lbs of variety meat: liver, heart, tongue, tripe, sweetbreads and. Transit weight loss and disease risk.

Cattle lose percent of their BW for every miles during transport. Fifty-three percent of that loss comes from the body and 47 percent from digestive tract water loss. Lack of feed and water accounts for 66 percent of weight loss during transit.

Cattle lose liveweight quickly in the first 12–16 hours off feed and water, then the rate of loss gradually decreases. This liveweight loss will not affect the carcase weight unless the animal is off feed for more than 48–72 hours. The following table shows expected weight loss in cattle.

The age to slaughter animals varies depending on many things. The highest quality beef comes from animals that are under 36 months of age. Old cows produce highly acceptable beef if properly fattened and processed.

Depending on the calf and the feeding regime, calves are best slaughtered between three and 16 weeks of age. Shrink in beef cattle is the loss of weight as a result of gut fill or tissue loss from the animal. How Does Shrink Occur?

Shrink occurs when the weight at one location is less than the subsequent weight at another location. Shrink occurs from the pasture to the working facilities, the pasture to the sale barn, or the ranch to the feedlot.cattle, especially in a situation where discounts apply to meat that is not up to specifications.

Primefact Tips for transporting cattle and sheep contains advice on ways to ensure that beef quality is maintained during the transporting of cattle. Entering data.

Select weight. Click on the arrow to choose either ‘live weight’ or.